We understand social distancing and quarantine can be difficult for children and adults.  Here, we are offering online activites.

If you are enjoying our home resources please consider making a donation to the American Labor Museum.  We appreciate your support during this difficult time.

Immigrant Families' Recipes to Make at Home

At the Museum, we've collected recipes from the families of immigrant laborers who lived and worked around Haledon, New Jersey in the early 1900's.  Children and adults are invited to try a traditional recipe

Coloring Pages:  Workers & Suffragettes

Do you like to color?  Here are a two series of coloring pages:  ILGWU Coloring Pages share the history of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union.  The union's story has been on display at the Museum in an exhibit entitled "Union Made:  Fashioning American in the 20th Century."   Workers Coloring Pages depict some jobs held by workers.  Can you make your own coloring page of a worker?

Throughout 2020, we are celebrating the Centennial of the 19th Amendment which guaranted women the right to vote.  Join us by downloading the free e-book "Remember the Ladies:  From Patriots in Petticoats to Presidential Candidates Amazing American Women Not Just a Coloring Book" by Carol Simon Levin at https://tellingherstories.com.

1913 Paterson Silk Strike Lesson & Role-Playing Cards

The Museum's headquarters, the Botto House National Landmark was a haven for free speech and assembly for thousands of striking silk mill workers in 1913.  Learn more about the strike through historic photographs, maps, facts and more.  Then, select a role-playing card and take on the role of a mill worker or a mill owner and act out your own ending to the strike.

Tour the Museum Virtually

Tour the Museum virtually:  Join Museum Director Angelica Santomauro and visit the our free lending library and permanent exhibit on the 1913 Paterson Silk Strike.  

Visual and Performing Labor Arts Projects to Create at Home

The Museum has received funding from the Puffin Foundation to host Saturday Labor Arts Classes for students from grades 3 through 5.  The purpose of the program is to introduce students to the history and contemporary isues of working people and immigrants through the visual and performing arts.  To create a Labor Arts project at your home, click on the links below for how-to instructions:

"My Everyday Working Hero"  There are heroes and heroines everywhere.  They are working in hospitals, schools, offices, homes and other places.  Write about and draw a picture of your working hero

"Old Joe and the Carpenter"  Listen to this Appalachian tale of tolerance.  Create a "barn quilt" with paper.

"Migrant Worker Biography Poem"  Learn about the life of eleven-year-old Ricardo ("Ricky") Salinas.  Write and recite a biography poem.  Print out and use this worksheet as you view this instructional video and, write your poem on it.  Read about Ricky's hero Cesar Chavez, a founder of the United Farm Workers union, which won better wages and working conditions for Ricky's family and others.

Collection Highlights

The museum collection reflects the stories of working people, immigrants and the labor movement and preserves their rich history.  To learn more, explore some collection highlights online:  Collection Highlights